fruit-3074848__340There are a plethora of memes across Facebook at the moment depicting the idyllic view of a snowday, families building a snowman, having a snowball fight and sledging making for a day full of fun. For most people, the reality is very different and it certainly has been for us.

Our children have very different reactions to news of a snowday. Once our eldest had been reassured that she would not be missing out on swimming at school, the prospect of a day or two at home was celebrated. As for our youngest, he was outside building a snowman before he had swallowed the last mouthful of porridge!

For GG it was a much more stressful experience. We had talked about snow and not being able to go to school but GG works in certainties. Routines are very important to GG and being told suddenly, midweek, that the normal school routine was disrupted was a tough message and it took a good hour of constant questions for GG to understand that she was not going to school.

Despite the bitter winds, the other two braved the outdoors for a good part of the morning. GG all wrapped up, lasted less than 5 minutes – it is hard enough walking through snow, so being unsteady on your feet makes it almost impossible. However, GG has thoroughly enjoyed watching our 6 month old puppies bounding around like lambs, and loves helping to dry them off when they finally decide to come back in.

winter-1861704_960_720 snow.jpg

For most kids, one of the positives is being allowed to watch TV or a film – particularly if like us, there are two parents trying to work from home! GG has never engaged with TV except for the odd episode of Mr Tumble. For GG, the iPad is her time out as she watches snatches of YouTube videos of babies and toddlers. Her current obsession is watching birthday parties for 1-3 year olds and she happily joins in a chorus of ‘Happy birthday’! The iPad has been GG’s saviour for the past two days.

The toughest part for GG is not knowing what will happen tomorrow. The continual ‘where me go tomorrow’ is part of our everyday. Even when the answer is certain and welcomed – for example, a clear answer of ‘GG go school tomorrow’ – GG asks over and over the same thing. Options are not helpful for GG so an answer of ‘maybe school or maybe stay home if more snow’ is anxiety inducing. We have tried hard to reassure her as we cannot give a definite answer – even putting out two lots of clothes ready for morning, to demonstrate the point.

We have had a few lovely moments today with a game of boccia (a type of sitting down indoor bowls), all 3 kids trying to peel mushrooms for dinner was a rather wonderful / stressful 10 minutes and there have been snippets of sibling harmony when all of the sofa cushions were used to build a DIY soft play! However overall, GG has had a much tougher couple of days than her siblings and this is something we need to try and improve on in the future.

I have taken lots of photos of our house and garden in the snow. Some pictures of the kids over the past two days so that in the future I can build a social story based on a real life example that will hopefully help us to prepare GG for future snow days.

In the meantime we will keep our fingers crossed that the snow stops, the wind dies down and GG can return to her normal routine ASAP.

Note: #LivingwithLD is a blog series about living with a daughter with a severe learning disability as part of an undiagnosed genetic condition. The series focuses on raising awareness of the challenges and joys of living in a household which embraces learning disability.


2017 GG’s Best Year Yet!


The past year has been a whirlwind  with significant changes in our lives and for GG it has, without doubt, been her best year yet.

The Big Move…

The big news of course was the house move, 200 miles from all that GG had ever known, to our new life in the country. The move has proven to be the best thing we could have done. We have the space for all that GG benefits from – a ball pool in her Peppa Pig bedroom, enough room to (clumsily) push her baby’s pushchair around the house and space to play away from her noisy younger brother. The outdoor space is even better and the investment in a sunken trampoline that GG can access without support has given her a new level of freedom.

The New School….

With the move has come a new school where GG has settled incredibly well. Described as the ‘mother hen’ in her classroom, GG has developed friendships and has made progress beyond our expectations. Her annual review started with ‘What do we like and admire about GG’ – it was an uplifting and positive experience, no longer fighting for her every need but surrounded by a team who could not be more helpful.

GG’s Busy Social Life….

The social opportunities have expanded as well – we have managed to replicate horse riding, swimming and Brownies and GG has adapted well. The addition of a local boccia group which her siblings join in too represents truly inclusive sports. Holiday club options have also worked well with GG happy to get on the bus with her packed lunch. Our precious girl has such a busy social calendar!

GG’s Love of Animals….

We have extended our repertoire of animals – GG still loves her daily Guinea Pig cuddles and is as excited as the day we first had them. The addition of an outdoor cat has had limited impact, however the 2 puppies we bought home in November have enhanced GG’s life beyond all of our expectations. There is no longer a fight over getting dressed in the morning as she is so keen to make it downstairs to see the ‘woofs’. The smile on her face as they welcome her makes all of the extra work worthwhile.

On the Health Front…

Medically 2017 was a relatively stable year, discharged from cardiology, better results from the eye tests, only a couple of UTIs and a subsequent scan showing no significant issues. Appointments with many other teams but none too worrying. Most of all GG’s epilepsy has improved – it is still there and we continue to sleep with one eye on her video monitor – however we have even removed one of her medications with no impact. We could not be more delighted and we hope we will see an improvement in concentration and behaviours as a result.

GG’s Major Achievements…

In addition to taking major changes in her stride throughout the year, in the last 2 months of 2017, GG had her art work displayed at a local show, coped with going on stage to receive donations on behalf of her holiday club, and most importantly leapt an astonishing 1 year and 4 months forward on the assessment of the level of her understanding. GG has also started to sing which delights her and all those around her. There is no doubt that 2017 was GG’s best year yet.

As we move into 2018….

We are so excited about what GG can achieve. Our focus on improving some of the challenging behaviours will continue. The EHCP transfer will no doubt prove a challenge, and just maybe 2018 will the year of the diagnosis for our gorgeous SWAN as we await results from the 100,000 Genomes study. Let’s hope 2018 will prove to be even better.

Where are the 98%? #Undiagnosed


Swan UK – Syndromes without a name – supports families with undiagnosed children. Currently Swan UK has a membership of around 2000 families – this is fantastic and the group is growing. However we know that around 6000 children are born every year who remain undiagnosed, which equates to over 100,000 children in the UK.

You can help us to find the 98% – those families currently walking this journey alone, who are unaware of the support available to them.

Why do we want to find them?

Do you remember being pregnant for the first time? That sense of joy, being overwhelmed and excited all at the same time. Do you recall how it felt to meet up with other pregnant ladies / expectant fathers at the ante natal classes, or to talk to those already with kids – the comfort in knowing that it is normal to feel exhausted, talking to others who have experienced the joy of the first kicks, the worry that comes with parenting.

Think back to when your baby was born – looking to the midwife for reassurance, googling the tiniest symptom for information, checking their weight against the little red book – the baby bible. The first day at nursery or school when there was not a dry eye at the gate – all of the parents in the same position.

Having a reference group is really important, others who can empathise and be around to support through the good and the bad.

The loneliness of being Undiagnosed

Now imagine that journey of pregnancy, being a first time parent, seeing your child grow but without that reference group around you. Imagine being the only one who was or has ever been pregnant. Imagine looking to the midwife for reassurance and instead getting a puzzled look. Imagine standing alone outside the school gate on the first day.

This is how it felt to us before we found Swan UK. We were alone, isolated and desperately searching for answers. We still don’t have many answers but we do have place to go, a safe haven of others who understand how it feels. A group who face similar and altogether different challenges but who support each other through every step and together celebrate the good times.

A previous blog describes how it feels to remain undiagnosed:https://theworldofgorgeousgrace.com/2017/04/24/welcome-to-no-mans-land-undiagnosed-2

How Can Swan help

No child or parents journey is ever the same and each and every Swan is unique, however the value of having a virtual group around you, for support if not always answers cannot be overestimated.

Swan UK offers a range of ways to support families:

  • An active Facebook page – the source of a wealth of knowledge and 24/7 support from others in the network
  • Advice on genetic testing and the latest parliamentary as well as medical updates
  • Regional groups – both virtual and real life get togethers so we can meet others in a similar position
  • Funded days out that would otherwise be unobtainable to most families – including support for those who need practical help on the day
  • Campaigning to raise awareness and ensuring the undiagnosed and not forgotten

Undiagnosed Children’s Day 2017:

This years Undiagnosed Children’s Day is scheduled for 28th April and we would like you to help us find the missing 98%. Please share our blogs and stories on social media and help to find those who do not yet know how we can help.

How to Donate:

If you would like to make a donation to Swan UK you can do this via Just Giving or Virgin Money Giving or text SWAN11 plus the amount (up to £10) to 70070.

Delivering a Diagnosis


For the 6000+ children a year born with an undiagnosed genetic condition, and their families, a long awaited diagnosis can be both a positive and negative experience. Seeking the elusive unifying diagnosis that often ties together a host of conditions, is a long and difficult journey – combining the hope that diagnosis may bring, with the fear of what it may mean.

In recent months, many families have been receiving a diagnosis through their genetics teams – the DDD study, 100,000 genomes and incredible genetics progress is giving more and more families the answers they seek. However the experience of those on the receiving end is varied, sometimes it is handled brilliantly but occasionally the way news is delivered is not ideal.

Examples of this include a letter landing on the doorstep with news of a diagnosis. Imagine waiting 5+ years for answers and to open a letter in the middle of breakfast with what is, to you, monumental news. On occasion, an invite to an unexpected appointment with the genetics team, with no explanation and weeks away, which results in high levels of tension and anticipation. Even attendance at a routine appointment with news delivered out of the blue.

In our case, we received such a letter and called to ask if it was a significant appointment or a routine review. We were told the latter, arrived at the appointment with 2 children in tow only to find that there was indeed ‘big news’ – this was broken to us whilst we fought to keep GG away from the taps given her obsession with water. As it turns out, the diagnosis found was not significant for GG you can read about the ‘Almost Diagnosis’ here:The ‘Almost’ Diagnosis

So, based on our experience and feedback from others in the SWAN world, here are a few pointers to those delivering news of a diagnosis to families:

  • Please pick up the phone! Let us know that something has been found that may or may not be of significance and that we should meet to discuss
  • Offer an appointment in a timely manner so that we are not waiting weeks and months for really important news
  • Ensure you provide as much information as possible about the diagnosis and what it could mean – we will google it anyway, so we value you being honest about the implications
  • Be clear if there are further steps to confirm the diagnosis and what happens next

We know that the science is fascinating to you and the progress in your field is incredible, but for us, this is about our child, our family, being sensitive to the impact such news can have is really critical. We also recognise you are incredibly busy and not best placed to provide post appointment support, but please do point families in the direction of those that can help – some ideas are below.

Finally, thank you from the bottom of our hearts for working so hard to help us find answers. A diagnosis, no matter how rare, is really important to us and our children.

Further support:

If you come across families that might benefit from extra support you can point them in the direction of:

SWAN UK – www.undiagnosed.co.uk

Unique – http://www.rarechromo.co.uk

Rare disease UK – http://www.raredisease.org.uk

Blogfest16 and the Swan Bloggers

Last Saturday, I attended the Mumsnet #Blogfest16 – my first experience of such an event and I loved it. A room full of inspirational, world changing and passionate (mostly) women – all of whom are bold and brave in sharing their life experiences online, for the greater good. In describing why I came away so bolstered and enthusiastic, I have given many examples from informative sessions, to truly hilarious stage shows, to a range of fab ideas for how I can be so much better as a blogger.

However, if I am completely honest, the main reason I had a great day, rather than a good day, was the amazing group of Swan bloggers who also attended.

swan-uk-image(Swan UK = Syndromes without a name)

I have come to think of the Swan bloggers as fabulous virtual friends – I have met some of them once or twice, others I met for the first time in person at Blogfest. Yet I am more honest with this group than many others in my life, and it feels immediately comfortable to be in their presence. I care passionately about what is happening in their lives, I shed tears of sadness and laughter on a regular basis reading their blogs, I truly appreciate their encouragement, honesty and support with my own writing. Being part of a group that is – bit by bit – changing the world for Undiagnosed children is incredibly empowering.

I loved the way that as a group, we were rooting for the amazing Liz with her ‘Are you Kiddingney’ blog to win the best campaigner award. An incredible talent, read more here…..https://areyoukiddingney.wordpress.com/.

I loved the way the group interacted with others – open minded and open hearted. I was proud to be part of a recognised group, with others commenting on how supportive and non judgemental this lovely gang is. I loved the fact that when unable to spot anyone I knew (I am known for my inability to recognise others in large crowds), a fellow Swan blogger spotted me and pointed me back to the herd. Most of all, I loved the fact that I laughed so much, despite tackling some tough topics, this group is so much fun to be with. And, as it turns out, a few of them share my penchant for too much wine….cheers ladies!

To find out more about Swan UK click here….https://www.undiagnosed.org.uk/

To read more Swan UK blogs click here….https://www.undiagnosed.org.uk/news-events/

Dear Mrs May….

EU pic

Dear Mrs May…..Firstly I would like to extend my congratulations on your appointment as Prime Minister. I am of course aware of the significant challenge you are now facing in leading the UK through the separation process from the EU.

I am contacting you now, to ask that as part of this separation process, that the relatively small –  but very important – rare disease and undiagnosed community are considered.

I am the mother of a child with an undiagnosed genetic condition – one of 6000 unique children  born every year. There are many more diagnosed with rare diseases. The EU has made rare disease a strategic health priority, and its’ influence in this area has been significant.

You may already be aware that the UK is the centre for genetic research for rare diseases and I can only assume that we will lose this status in due course. These genetic research programmes are the hope we have for a future diagnosis –  which is our only chance of a prognosis, potential treatment and maybe prevention in future generations.

There is a high level of anxiety in the disability community, that is amplified in the rare disease and undiagnosed community, as we face the possibility of losing the significant EU investment in this field. For many of our community, we fear there will simply be too few affected patients in the UK to justify the investment required.

The key benefits of the EU focus in this area to date are:

  • Collaboration across borders and critical mass for an otherwise small population
  • Shared skills, resources and information – including access to niche experts across all countries
  • Research funding (otherwise cost prohibitive)
  • Medicine authorisation across the EU (otherwise cost prohibitive)
  • Innovation and knowledge transfer permitted by European Directives
  • Health benefits for those in the rare / undiagnosed community

I appreciate it is too early to begin to understand the full implications of Brexit. However if consideration can be given to protecting some of the critical work in this area, it would be of significant benefit to this community.

I, and many others, sincerely hope that you will give this full and proper consideration.



Frustration, swearing and tears….

The biggest myth of all – the support for disabled children is good.  Adequate is a massive overstatement. Naively us special needs parents, anticipate that the care will we need is there. At the start – still in shock, we navigate our way through, expecting that at some point it comes together. It hasn’t happened yet.


For us, physio was the first non-hospital based support we accessed. Not rolling, not sitting, can’t even straighten her legs, we need help. From referral to the first appointment it took 3 months. Let me say that again – 3 months. How old was GG? 6 months old. We spent one third of her precious life waiting for that first appointment.

At last the day arrived, we were optimistic, nervous but hopeful of some support. A 3 month wait and a very hassled and over worked physio spent 30 minutes with our daughter. Let me say that again – 30 minutes. After a 3 month wait. When we will see you again? The desperation in our voices, greater than in the famous song. Perhaps a month, maybe 6 weeks. Keep doing the exercises I showed you. We are flummoxed, novices, lost in a scary world with no help. Turns out that every 6 weeks would have been a dream, 4 times a year has been the average. We spend on average £1500 per year on private physio. Not everyone in the same situation can.

Weight gain is poor, solid food cannot be managed – all her peers on baby led weaning, I frankly want to swear. I do. Appropriately, Speech and language is the referral made (SALT in SEN lingo), they can help with eating. We wait for 2 months. Nothing. We self refer to a private SALT and are seen weekly for 3 months before we get an appointment. We waited 5 months. Our baby was not gaining weight and we waited 5 months for the original appointment.

Next was the Occupational Therapist (OT). We needed stuff – equipment, standing frames, special seats, advice on car seats – the physio said we needed stuff but we had to go back to the consultant for a referral. The referral was made when GG was just 2 years old. The first OT we saw was when she started school at age 4.5 years. By this point we were no longer surprised. Disappointed yes, but not surprised. In the meantime, we got stuff – we bought it from SEN sites, we researched car seats and found one that worked. Alone again.

Alone The common thread to all of these referrals was the lack of diagnosis. Every therapist asking us ‘what is the medical condition?’ – we don’t know. We have been told we may never know but we struggle to believe this. We live in the UK, post 2010, surely we will find out one day soon? More than 5 years into our journey and still no answers. It turns out that no label = more hassle. Professionals do not know how to deal with those who remain undiagnosed. Even at times told,further support will be looked at once a diagnosis is confirmed. We are in limbo.

It is incredible that we have to ask and fight for these services. Incredible that we were not referred at the first point of contact. Incredible that one therapist cannot refer to another and we have to start from scratch. Incredible that we have to justify our need for the support because we do not fit into a box.

For context, I have described 3 out of 24 non-medical touchpoints that we have or will need to access in the future. This is the reality of how unco-ordinated and under funded services are.

Out of the Box

The frustration, swearing and tears have eventually resulted in a pro-active and positive effort to make a change. 6000 children are born each year with no diagnosis. Many many more, with a diagnosis, will still suffer from the lack of co-ordination. Please support #outofthebox Out of the Box


#undiagnosed should not be a barrier. Please support @swan_uk who provide a lifeline to those with no diagnosis.

*Each individual therapist has tried their hardest to help. This is no way reflects on the individuals but the system. More training on #undiagnosed is needed to avoid delays in services because of a lack of a label.

Swan UK have provided a lifeline to all we have faced in the past 2 years. We need this group and funding is at a critical junction with some big grants ending. My one request is to help support Swan UK to continue running and supporting the 1000 families already signed up, as well as reaching out to the 1000s of other families battling in isolation.

If you would like to donate to support the work of SWAN UK you can do so via the Just Giving page or our Virgin Money Giving page. You can also donate by texting SWAN11 £3 (or any amount up to £10) to 70070




A year ago, on Undiagnosed Children’s Day 2015, I took my first tentative steps into the world of Twitter Takeover for Swan UK. It was a daunting as a newbie to the world of blogging and Twitter. The overwhelming support on the day resulted in a baptism of fire as #undiagnosed started trending, and the Swan UK feed was impossible to keep up with. It was a fantastic day, knowing that so many people cared, and that we reached so many with the message that #undiagnosed remains a significant issue in the modern medical world.

I continued to blog for a couple of months and through the year, hosted a few more Twitter Takeovers, but found myself struggling to keep publishing despite continuing to write posts on a regular basis. Partly this was down to everyday life. As with all families we have experienced ups and downs, the challenge and joy of 3 young children, with the additional complexities of a child with an undiagnosed genetic condition. Add to this some challenging work situations and I found myself eager to pursue the campaigning but struggling to find a way.

In the autumn, I was thrown off course by the ‘Almost Diagnosis’ (further details in a previous blog The ‘Almost’ Diagnosis) – so close yet so far from finding out the cause of GG’s challenges. Although the ‘almost diagnosis’ is still not ruled out, we are awaiting cardiology and orthoptic reviews, (8 months after referrals were made, grrr) – it remains an unlikely outcome. The ‘Almost Diagnosis’ did however prompt a key question – we know that GG suffers from a rare disease so what difference would a diagnosis make?

I accept that lots of things would not be any different – the constant seizure watch that has me sleeping with one eye open, focused on the video monitor. The addition of another issue to the list – uneven leg length. The myriad of appointments, the challenge of getting into school to meet with teachers and therapists and the increasing behavioural challenges to manage. Please don’t get me started on the battles to get GG into out of school activities – so simple for the majority and yet so hard to find acceptance for GG.

However some things would be different. The lack of diagnosis and associated lack of prognosis means that we did not anticipate a leg length issue, we were not looking for it, a diagnosis may well have told us what to watch for. The knowledge of whether this is a hereditary issue that could affect future generations, that could have opened the door for us to have another. A personal outcome I hope for, would reduce the guilt – I made GG in my body so I will always be responsible, however to put to bed those thoughts which linger in the early hours, was it the blue cheese I ate before I knew I was pregnant? Did I do something else to cause this?

In the past year, the continuous and repetitive assessments for support have continued – we do not fit into a neat box that dictates the support we need. We successfully negotiated our way through the transition from SEN nursery to SEN primary – a journey that was far from seamless. The battle that followed to secure appropriate school transport was another saga. The annual Disability Living Allowance review – often awarded for 5 years to those with a diagnosis – another 42 page form plus appendices. Even down to the box marked ‘medical condition’ to obtain a Queue Assist pass at a theme park. All would be easier if we had a name. As one wise and respected disability lobby group wrote ‘a firm medical diagnosis is hard to ignore’ – and the lack of one creates reason for doubt.

The one upside of no diagnosis is being a part of Swan UK. It is by far the best support group I have been a part of and I have tried a few. 24/7 support from others in the same position, always someone to listen, always someone to celebrate the successes, we are in this together. In the past year, Swan have ensured we are fully informed about the opportunities for diagnosis – incorrect info from professionals that we have been able to challenge – thanks to the knowledge of the staff and other families. We have met with other families, enjoyed an awesome day out together which would not have been possible without Swan UK.

Mostly though, Swan UK has inspired me to try and make a difference. Thanks to a bloggers workshop in the New Year, the collective brains and passion of those in the room gave me the impetus I needed to start a campaign for co-ordinated care. I have no campaign experience, I am a working mum with an incredibly busy home life but determined to try and make a change.

I have recently launch #outofthebox (Out of the Box) to try and improve care for those with #undiagnosed conditions. I have rediscovered my mojo, I have a purpose and I have an amazing support network who give me honest feedback and incredible input.

I will however finish with some positives in the past year, steps that are miniscule to most children but to GG have been significant. Firstly, GG is drinking more, still not enough, but we no longer battle to get tiny amounts of liquid into her. We now have c.80% success with daytime toileting, a phenomenal life skill to achieve. Gross motor skills have progressed well and GG has discovered a love of singing – the most beautiful sound. I have succeeded in finding swimming, horse riding and a Rainbows group that are now welcoming GG with open arms and recognising the contribution she makes to the class. Seeing GG swim independently with a woggle is my memory of the year.

So what next? In the next 12 months our hopes are to discount the ‘Almost Diagnosis’ (all fingers and toes crossed….) and be moved onto the 100,000 genomes project as the next leading research programme. Although likely to be a long lead time, it is the best chance we have of finding a diagnosis. We will battle the transition from ‘statement of educational needs’ to EHCP and we will get the support GG needs. I hope to make an impact with the #outofthebox campaign and influence policy makers to spend their money on care and not repetitive assessments. I plan to investigate therapies to help GG with sensory needs in the hope of helping with behaviours. I may even get brave enough to face the application process for respite care. Mostly I hope to continue to enjoy my fab family, my gorgeous GG and keep everyone as healthy and happy as possible.

Swan UK have provided a lifeline to all we have faced in the past 2 years. We need this group and funding is at a critical junction with some big grants ending. My one request is to help support Swan UK to continue running and supporting the 1000 families already signed up, as well as reaching out to the 1000s of other families battling in isolation.

If you would like to donate to support the work of SWAN UK you can do so via the Just Giving page or our Virgin Money Giving page. You can also donate by texting SWAN11 £3 (or any amount up to £10) to 70070

Happy Undiagnosed Children’s Day 2016!!


Out of the Box

Out of the Box

Out of the Box – Campaigning for Co-ordinated Care for Children with Undiagnosed Genetic Conditions

As GG’s mother, I have spent the past 5+ years navigating my way around the services provided by local authorities, the Community NHS and the DWP. Firstly, I would like to say how grateful we are for the services provided, we benefit from some good services, an excellent school, a great transport company, the support of therapists and a fab school nurse.

However, accessing this support has been a significant challenge – you have to fight every step of the way to secure the support your child needs. Excluding medical involvement, there are no less than 24 touch points for different services.

For each of the 24 touch points, there is a separate assessment process. Each assessment is time consuming, intensive and requires us to continually ‘prove’ that our child is disabled enough to meet the criteria. For the service providers, it means duplication, repetition and specialist resources focused on assessment rather than provision of the service.

Although in the end we have mostly been successful in securing the support needed, the journey has been tough. As GG remains undiagnosed, this adds extra complexity to the processes. On most forms there is a small box marked ‘please describe medical condition’. This is not straightforward. This is a very long list.

Disability Living Allowance awards are generally only made one year at a time as no diagnosis results in no firm prognosis. Despite little changing year on year, we have to repeat the 42 page form with 10+ appendices. This year it took me more than 6 hours in total In the UK there are 6000 children born each year without a diagnosis, none of whom fit in a box.

My vision for the future is of one combined specialist assessment team. They could provide the focal point for the child and their family, assessing their needs across a range of different services – from School Places to Blue Badges, Respite Care to Housing Adaptations. This would allow the delivery teams to focus on provision of services – which I know from regular inter-actions is what they want to do.

There would be multiple benefits to this approach. In this world, diagnosis or no diagnosis, the teams would focus on the needs of the child, not what we are able to write in a box. Being undiagnosed would no longer be a barrier.

For the family it would also remove the continual assessments and allow for fair and consistent decisions. From a funding perspective, this would eliminate a lot of waste in the current system and allow funds to be spent on delivering services, rather than cumbersome and costly assessment and appeal processes.

I appreciate such change is significant and I am presenting a simplistic view of a cross authority / cross team approach. However, I passionately believe that in combining resources – in this case for assessment purposes – we could achieve better outcomes. In the short term, simple changes could reduce wastage. For example, a child allocated a place at a Special Needs School will have a complex disability so it would appear logical that they will require a Blue Badge, transport to school and access to respite services. I am sure this co-ordinated approach would benefit families and service providers.

I will shortly be launching my campaign ‘Out of the Box’ to improve the co-ordination of care for disabled children and specifically to remove the barriers for those who do not have a diagnosis. We should not be penalised for not fitting in a box. By thinking out of the box, some small changes could have a big impact.