WHY MY MOBILE CHILD NEEDS A BLUE BADGE

blue badge pic

There has been a great deal of discussion over the past week around the consultation on blue badge provision for those with hidden disabilities. This is very topical for us as we are currently appealing the decision to not award a renewal of GG’s blue badge. I resisted the temptation to immediately jump into the discussion and instead opted to track how and why the blue badge is important for GG.

GG does have physical disabilities including low tone, hypermobility, a discrepancy in leg length and some dodgy bone alignments, although she is mobile and can walk short distances. GG does need help to get into the car and be safely strapped in. However the need for a blue badge is driven equally as much by her hidden disabilities – as I hope to explain by giving you an overview of the past week.

Thursday after school: GG arrived home from school and was having a tough day. We immediately needed to jump into the car to collect big sister from her after school club. I carried GG to the car and lifted her into the car seat (all 24kg!) and gave GG her blankie and an apple for comfort. We drove to school to find the blue badge space occupied by a non blue badge user. I parked further away – knowing that getting GG and her younger brother out of the car to go and collect her sister would be even more stressful. Instead I dashed over and asked another Mum to send big sister over to me, which she kindly did. Had I been able to access the blue badge space, I would have been directly outside for big sister and would not have had to leave GG unattended whilst distressed (even for the shortest of times).

Saturday morning: We attended a session for children with special needs at a Children’s Centre. The blue badge spaces are c. 200m from the door to the centre. GG was doing okay so, with support, I helped her out of the car and we walked round. GG had a lovely time but unfortunately hates leaving, she refused point blank to walk back to the car. I left her and younger brother with a member of staff whilst I ran to get GG’s specialist buggy which I loaded her into, and then transferred her to the car. In a normal parking space this would result in a number of issues – not being able to wheel GG’s buggy to the car door so I would have to carry her from the rear of the car, and also not being able to open the door wide enough to lift GG in.

Saturday afternoon: We stopped for lunch at a garden centre. Unfortunately they had no mashed potato which is GG’s staple diet when we are out. This resulted in a lot of distress for GG and despite having walked in quite happily, I had to carry her back to the car. Without the blue badge I would have had to carry her much further and also relied on big sister to make sure her younger brother was safe across the car park. GG was not co-operating so getting her into her car seat was a battle and without the extra space at the sides would have been impossible. Even had GG walked she has very limited safety awareness so my attention has to be 100% on keeping her safe in a car park.

Sunday afternoon: Younger brother had a party at soft play. GG was really tired and so I used the buggy to transport her in and out of the session. She sat playing with the babies, only going up to the big slide with her Dad’s help. There is no blue badge parking at this play centre (I have asked why) but I was fortunate to get an end space, with enough space to pull the buggy up alongside.

Monday evening: Swimming lesson night! GG loves the water but comes out shattered. GG completely refused to put her boots back on (after a battle to shower, get dried and dressed). Once again I carried her, shoeless this time, back to the car and lifted her into her car seat. Being right next to the entrance was much needed as I hauled swim bags x 3 plus 2 tired kids outside, whilst carrying a non-co-operative GG.

Tuesday evening: Big sister’s hockey training night. Again GG did not want to leave the house after school, so she was placated with a bag of crisps and her blankie, and carried to the car. Getting her out again to drop her sister off would have added to her distress, so being able to pull into the blue badge space nearest the pitch meant I could wave big sister off without needing to – a massive bonus.

So as you can see, almost daily – even on a school week, the blue badge really helps to make life a little easier. In the school holidays we would be much less able to get out without it.

There are a a couple of questions I have been asked that I also think are worth addressing.

Are GG’s needs more than those of a toddler? GG is like a young toddler in a (tall) 7 year old’s body. Having had 3 children, I have faced the challenge of not being able to open a car door sufficiently to help a young child into a car seat. However there are always other options – I (like many) have lifted a baby in through the car window. I have helped a toddler clamber through from the front seat and leaned through to the back to secure the seatbelt. With GG, I cannot use these methods and my only option is to put her in the buggy, on a safe pavement and move my car to somewhere we have space. GG doesn’t understand what is happening and thinks I am driving away without her – it is so stressful for her and an absolute last resort.

What if there are not enough blue badge spaces? I have a lot of sympathy with this argument but if for example, there were not enough hospital beds for those needing one would we argue that some people didn’t get one, or would we fight for more spaces? If more spaces are needed then let’s make sure they are provided.

I hope that this has given you an insight into our life and how a blue badge has made a significant positive impact. As you have read, a blue badge is really important when you have a child who has behaviour challenges due to a learning disability, which often results in carrying and lifting to the car. It is important to a child who cannot manage long distances and tires easily, so still needs use of a specialist buggy. It is important to me when I need space to lift an older child into a car seat, because they physically can’t or won’t co-operate with you. Both the physical and hidden disabilities justify the need.

I would welcome your support on the consultation which can be found here: https://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/R2OF6/

 

16 thoughts on “WHY MY MOBILE CHILD NEEDS A BLUE BADGE

  1. This is so important for people to understand. Max doesn’t have physical issues but he does have a blue badge as he is autistic. Before we had a car he was in his specialist buggy everywhere we went, but trying to get him to stay calm on public transport wasn’t easy. Getting the Motability car made all the difference, but he still needs me to strap him into his car seat and make sure he’s comfortable before driving off. He also has a tendency to open the car door with quite some force which has meant some very near misses with it hitting the car next to us.
    The blue badge means we’re able to try going to new places and not have the stress of the longer walking between car and destination, and the same in reverse when he can quite often be very close to meltdown mode after using up all his energy to explore wherever we’ve been.
    It’s been an absolute godsend for us!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Great post – you can’t argue with real life examples. One thing I wonder is about those situations where you use the blue badge but GG doesn’t enter or exit the vehicle. I do the same, frequently, when I need to drop off my other children or pick them up and Benjy is attached to his feed, or it’s just too cold to want to get him out, etc. Technically we shouldn’t be using a blue badge for this… But I wonder if that aspect of the law needs to change too? Xx

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Your post really brings home the challenges that many people face in getting out about when they are caring for someone with hidden disabilities, and why a blue badge is needed by some. I know that we often struggle with my eldest when we are out and he gets over-stimulated, which results in a refusal to move or lashing out. I do hope that you are successful in your appeal

    #NeurodiversityNotions

    Liked by 1 person

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