MY LEARNING DISABLED CHILD IS NOT A BURDEN ON SOCIETY

 

society-image

On the contrary, GG contributes significantly to the world we live in and genuinely helps to make it a better place. It would be so easy to launch into stories of inspirational Paralympians, people with Downs Syndrome running their own business, or the building evidence of genius’s and talented artists who were likely on the autism spectrum but it is so much simpler.

GG brings immense joy to our lives and to those around her, she enjoys the simple pleasures in life and reminds us what is important. GG is not encumbered by financial concerns or fears of what is happening in this world but revels in the here and now, something we can all learn from. Being able to giggle at the daft things, she keeps alive the best of toddlerhood lurking inside us all.

GG is also completely non-judgemental – she takes people as they come. Racism, ageism, fat-ism, none of this would even occur to her. GG is the only person I know who honestly has no unconscious bias.

Along with most children with disabilities, GG demonstrates a level of bravery that I could certainly only aspire to. I am ashamed to think back to the levels of complaining when I suffered with back issues on and off through my 20s. It wasn’t nice and the physio was not fun. GG does physio every day. Climbing stairs is always hard for her but she does, all the time. Epilepsy is hideous and whilst I am still recovering from the aftermath of a seizure and my reaction, GG picks herself up and carries on with her day. If the rest of the human race was half as resilient as my daughter, this world would be a much better place.

The other fabulous trait that makes me smile all the time, is a complete disregard for materialistic possessions. Don’t get me wrong, GG has many many toys as we feel compelled as parents to surround our children with gawdy plastic items. The truth however is that GG is completely happy with her baby doll, a pram and an apple. Even the tooth fairy brings chocolate to GG. Yes, she will also be entertained by the iPad but it isn’t an important factor in her life, and TV is for wimps who feel the need to sit down!

If the view of ‘contributing to society’ is obtaining a degree, having a distinguished career or excelling as a football player then no, it is unlikely that GG will do any of these things. However, for the majority of people, the important things in life are not achievement or materialistic based. Caring, sharing joy and valuing other people are what matters and GG exhibits these traits more than most.

Despite the huge progress in attitudes to disability and having come a long way from when disabled people were hidden away, it is a sad position that I, and other parents, find ourselves having this debate. However when I have heard so many challenges as to why public money should fund services to disabled children, it cannot be ignored. Early intervention, good education and enablement therapies ensure that disabled people are empowered to contribute to society so let’s fight to continue to make provision better.

 

3 thoughts on “MY LEARNING DISABLED CHILD IS NOT A BURDEN ON SOCIETY

  1. As a Montessori Teacher myself and growing up in a school which included disabled children I agreed completely. They give society way more than we think. We just need to have a mindful openness about it and reflect. And we can do way more!

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